Crime and Race

The Diversity Recession by Steve Sailer
Diversity is Strength!—and a Massive Housing Crisis

A couple of crime-related links:

The Truth of Interracial Rape in the United States by Lawrence Auster

Like Ahab’s search for the Great White Whale, liberals’
search for the Great White Defendant is relentless and never-ending.
When, in 1988, Tawana Brawley’s and Al Sharpton’s then year-old
spectacular charge that several white men including prosecutor Steven
Pagones (whose name Brawley had picked out of a newspaper article) had
abducted and raped the 15 year old was shown to be completely false,
the Nation said it didn’t matter, since the charges expressed the
essential nature of white men’s treatment of black women in this
country. When the Duke University lacrosse players were accused of
raping a black stripper last year, liberals everywhere treated the
accusation as fact, because, just as with the Nation and Tawana
Brawley, the rape charge seemed to the minds of liberals to reflect the
true nature of oppressive racial and sexual relations in America.

Speaking of Auster, he’s mentioned in this hard-to-find article by Pat Buchanan.

And you can do your own exploration of race and crime at the Bureau of Justice.

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One Response to Crime and Race

  1. Thanks for the Buchanan article. Here is another unusually honest article from 1991 about the consequences of projected demographic changes in the US. The author is Japanese which may explain the refreshing candor.

    http://articles.chicagotribune.com/1991-04-16/news/9102030765_1_ethnic-industrial-blacks-and-hispanics

    In terms of crime and race, I’ve found Anthony Walsh’s ‘Race & Crime: A Biosocial Analysis’ quite interesting. You can read parts of it from google books. The data on low crime rates amongst poor Asians in the US (p 32-33) is quite useful when people try to argue that poverty invariably results in high crime rates.

    http://tinyurl.com/3nhe4ea

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